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    3D Nip Tuck: When Enough is Enough with Virtual Art Direction

    After the tenth time under the knife, the celebrity says to the plastic surgeon, “ I dunno doc, it just doesn’t look real.” Excessive tweaking can go terribly wrong. The same is true with 3D image creation – over-directed art can suffer a loss of quality and realism.

    Too little input in the early stages can miss the vision and mean costly “retakes.” Too much direction in the latter stages can produce unrealistic lighting effects, surface textures, and other 3D image quality issues.

    Here’s an example of a 3D image gone wrong.

    3DArtDirection_Recommended 3DArtDirection_Overdirected
    Dramatic directional lighting for realistic shading and reflections Improper Lighting: The client has requested the room be evenly lit and that the refrigerator surface and all cabinets have the same color – really meaning, the same “lighting value” – to avoid shaded areas and reflections. As a result, natural lighting and textures have been compromised.
    “Ambient occlusion” or attempts to model the way light realistically radiates, especially where objects intersect or where light encounters non-reflective surfaces No Shadows: The client has requested that the shadows created by this affect be removed. As a result, the lighting effects that would happen naturally around objects are missing, creating a lifeless look.
    Optimal contrast of colors and textures Poor Contrast and Dull Textures:  Changes to colors and textures have reduced contrast and created a muddied appearance.
    Attractive set propping to create a realistic lifestyle shot Under-propped: Requests to have most props removed, replaced or scaled to less realistic sizes, have reduced the lived-in space feel.
    Realistic stainless steel textures including natural light reflection and subtle imperfections that show bowing in the metal Over-perfected: Requests to have reflections and bowing removed have resulted in dull and unrealistic stainless textures.
    Photo-realistic “blown out white” window effect, reflecting what happens when a dim interior is exposed for visibility Unrealistic External Environment: The client has requested a yard with grass and trees be made visible through the window which conflicts with the lighting applied to the interior.

     

    Quality is a delicate balance. The best results come from a healthy pairing of client art direction with 3D expertise and interior design savvy. Not only is greater photo-realism achieved, but 3D images stay on vision, on time and on budget.

    For more on perfecting the 3D shot, download Keeping It Real: Art Directing the 3D Set Shot.

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